SanDisk Memory Card Deal Buy a 400GB Micro SDXC Card for Only

first_img Document every moment without limits and buy one of the ultimate SanDisk memory cards. With a capacity of 400GB, you won’t be running out of storage anytime soon. Be quick and buy it now at Amazon’s dirt-cheap price of just £56.29 — available for a limited time.Dropping from a previous cost of £118.96, 400GB of data definitely doesn’t come cheap. But now with a discount of nearly £63 on its highest price, it’s time to jump on that all-important storage and ensure your files are all backed up. Especially as Amazon’s prices are constantly fluctuating, we’re not sure how long this absolute bargain will last. Our advice? Buy now and thank us later! SanDisk 400GB Memory Card DealSanDisk Ultra 400GB microSDXC Memory Card + SD AdapterGet your hands on a whopping 400GB SanDisk memory card for less and store Full HD video, pictures and music. Transfer 100MB/s, all for a limited time only price of just £56.29.Amazon|Save £62.67|Now £68.59View DealNow £68.59|Save £62.67|Amazon We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor For Android users, you can also benefit from the SanDisk Memory Zone. Easy to download through the Google Play store, the app is one for fans of scrupulous organisation. Utilise the app and better understand how you’re making the most of your storage. Browse files effortlessly to see exactly what you’re holding onto.Not only is the 400GB SanDisk Micro SDXC memory card now at a brand new low price on Amazon of £56.29, but this purchase makes life that little bit easier with an SD adaptor included. Access your files with ease and save big on storage for those precious digital files.For more amazing offers, follow us @TrustedDealsUK Dealscenter_img This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Whether you’re looking to store the soundtrack of your life (that is, music files), those sacred memories captured in video or as photos. Or you simply want to expand your gaming library on your Nintendo Switch, purchasing a Micro SD Card is essential.Made particularly for the likes of large video content, you can expect a speed of 100MB/s, even when transferring Full HD video footage. The best part? As well as hours of videos of your cat and holiday selfies, for Android smartphone and tablet users, 400GB of storage could be just what your device needs.The SanDisk memory card means business, speeding up the performance of flicking between and loading apps with its A1 Rating. For the heavy mobile phone users out there (we’re looking at you), purchasing a SanDisk Micro SDXC is ideal for improving the general functionality of your phone. SanDisk 400GB Memory Card DealSanDisk Ultra 400GB microSDXC Memory Card + SD AdapterGet your hands on a whopping 400GB SanDisk memory card for less and store Full HD video, pictures and music. Transfer 100MB/s, all for a limited time only price of just £56.29.Amazon|Save £62.67|Now £68.59View DealNow £68.59|Save £62.67|Amazonlast_img read more

Apple looks set to make the iPhone a lot bigger and a

first_img We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Apple is planning to make its flagship iPhones significantly larger… but also smaller, a new report has claimed.Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who’s widely known for leaking Apple’s plans, has just released a research note to the Taiwanese press, claiming that a trio of new iPhones will be released in the second half of 2020.Read more: Best iPhoneTwo of these will be high-end, flagship models that will support 5G and measure in at 5.4-inches and 6.7-inches (via MacRumors). That’s right − 6.7-inches.These will almost certainly land as the company’s first ever 5G handsets.Apple’s current flagship models, the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max, measure in at 5.8-inches and 6.5-inches respectively, so it looks like − at least in terms of screen size, at least − Apple is set to go to two extremes next year, to cater to consumers who want a legitimate big-screen experience and those who are after a phone they comfortably use one-handed.Does this mean the constantly rumoured iPhone SE 2 is dead? The original iPhone SE has a 4-inch display, so there’s a tiny bit of hope for a follow-up yet.According to Kuo, the 5.4-inch and 6.7-inch models will be joined by a slightly less premium 6.1-inch iPhone. This variant sounds like a follow-up of sorts to the iPhone XR (which also measure in at 6.1-inches), and it won’t include support for 5G.Kuo says that all three of Apple’s late-2020 iPhone models will feature an OLED display.Read more: Best smartphoneThe word on the street is that a trio of new iPhones will come out this September too, one of which could be called the iPhone 11.This year’s new iPhone releases will likely miss out on 5G altogether, but Apple is widely believed to be plotting triple rear cameras for these models, as well as a healthy battery boost and potentially a switch from Lightning to USB-C too. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

Why central banks — including Canadas — are finding it so hard

first_img Email Join the conversation → Share this storyWhy central banks — including Canada’s — are finding it so hard to get interest rates back to ‘normal’ territory Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Facebook Bloomberg News Comment Canadian housing slump deepens with first drop in values in decades Sponsored By: Reddit March 14, 20191:12 PM EDT Filed under News Economy Theophilos Argitis What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Central bankers have long been crafting analogies to explain what they do — think taking away the punch bowl. Few have been as devoted to the art as Stephen Poloz.He’s trying to steer the economy back to a place where it can support the kind of borrowing costs that counted as normal before 2008. But Poloz’s metaphors often have to do with unforeseen hardships when you’re on the way home — sailors blown off course, or drivers caught in winter storms. Because, like many global peers, he’s finding the journey hard to map out.One reason is a feature of today’s developed economies that isn’t normal at all by past standards: their mountain of private debt. Canada has some of the most leveraged households anywhere — leading analysts to question how much higher rates can go, and even whether they’ve already gone too far. Consumer debt stabilizing, but Canadian banks face ‘significant’ risk if economy goes south, Moody’s warns Canadian home prices just had worst February since the financial crisis Canada has two economies. Let’s hope the government is paying attention to both With five interest-rate increases since 2017, the Bank of Canada is one of a handful to embark on sustained hiking. Poloz has even won international recognition for developing frameworks to manage the process. But there’s been no increase since October, and the Ottawa-based bank said last week that the cycle’s immediate future looks increasingly uncertain amid a global slowdown. Like the Federal Reserve, it’s essentially on hold, waiting to see what happens.‘I Feel It’Poloz acknowledges he’s getting heat over higher borrowing costs, in a country where so many households have a direct stake. People write to him. “Believe me, I feel it,” he said in an interview. “It’s not a theoretical exercise.”That helps explain the folksy analogies — and also Poloz’s discretionary approach. He shuns the precision of models, sees data more in terms of feeling a pulse than feeding a machine, and recognizes that central banking involves mystery as well as technical expertise.The goal is to assure as wide a chunk of the public as possible that policy makers won’t hike unless they’re sure the economy can cope with higher borrowing costs. As long as inflation isn’t a threat, they’ll put growth first.In the global monetary debate after 2008, Poloz has often been on the dovish side — particularly early in his term.The concern, then and now, is that cheap money is a zero-sum game. It brings spending forward, but slows it down in the future, and adds financial vulnerabilities — like high household debt and elevated housing prices in cities like Toronto and Vancouver.Gauge of HealthPoloz counters by pointing out that the leverage already out there makes tightening risky too. Plus, he sees potential long-term benefits from frontloading demand.Exports and investment remain below pre-crisis levels as a share of the economy, leaving Canada reliant on consumption and housing. Wage gains are smaller than in the past. The number of new firms being created, an important metric for Poloz, is lacklustre. What if Canada’s economy is on the cusp of an investment boom that may not be detectable yet, and companies are holding back because they lack confidence? Productivity typically picks up late in the business cycle, and policy makers shouldn’t get in the way of that by removing stimulus too quickly.Yet, if the purpose of low rates has been to nurse the economy back to normal, then the ability to raise them should be the ultimate gauge of health.With the jobless rate at four-decade lows, and underlying inflation back near the two per cent target, there were signs that the economy was nearing its capacity — which is why Poloz began to hike.Stuck HalfwayThe Bank of Canada has been envisaging a final resting place for rates around three per cent. But so far it’s only got about halfway there. And as other central banks scale back their expectations, investors are anticipating that Poloz will have to follow.Markets no longer believe he’ll be able to raise rates any further — or that Canada’s economy, burdened by heavy debt and aging demographics, can grow much faster than the current, modest pace. Ten-year Canadian bond yields are stuck below two per cent, lower even than they were on Poloz’s first day on the job in 2013.That raises an awkward question for Poloz, and maybe for some of his central-bank peers too: Has monetary policy already done all it can?As he prepares to enter the final year of his seven-year term, Poloz could lay claim to be one of Canada’s most successful central bankers ever. The country is closer to a state of full employment and stable prices than at any time since the 1960s — exactly the sort of benchmarks policy makers are supposed to aim for.It’s just that one of the slowest recoveries on record wouldn’t be a very satisfying finish line. Most economists currently put potential growth at no higher than two per cent. In the last six quarters the economy hasn’t even managed that, averaging 1.6 per cent.As well as telling stories about journeys home, Poloz also likes to invoke “Mother Nature” and argue that economies are capable of regenerating themselves. In the interview, he expressed confidence that Canada can climb back toward the faster growth it once took for granted — if “all the ingredients work out.”“I see no reason why we should settle for our two per cent trend-line,” he said.–With assistance from Erik Hertzberg.Bloomberg.com center_img TD predicts Bank of Canada will keep rate on hold through 2020 Related Stories Consumer debt stabilizing, but Canadian banks face ‘significant’ risk if economy goes south, Moody’s warns More 8 Comments ← Previous Next → Featured Stories advertisement Why central banks — including Canada’s — are finding it so hard to get interest rates back to ‘normal’ territory Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz acknowledges he’s getting heat over higher borrowing costs from Canadians themselves Twitter Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz. The Bank of Canada has been envisaging a final resting place for rates around three per cent.Darren Brown for National Post last_img read more

Interbike Reno 2018 Here are all the cool and crazy new electric

The indoor expo at the 2018 Interbike bicycle trade show in Reno, NV has kicked off. Nearly all of the world’s biggest electric bicycle brands are here showing of their newest e-bike models, parts, accessories and even some surprisingly weirder offerings.Here’s a breakdown of all the best new offerings in the world of electric bicycles and other light electric vehicles. more… Source: Charge Forward

Roborace Drops Fully Driverless Car For First Season

first_imgThe driverless racing car initiative Roborace will commence its inaugural season with an upgraded version of its autonomous development car and not the bespoke Robocar revealed last year. ‘DevBot 2.0’ retains the LMP-inspired design of the original mule but will be rear-wheel-drive instead of all-wheel-drive and has updated styling and hardware.Motorsport.com has learned that the initial season will likely comprise fewer than 10 cars, which will be piloted by a human for one part of the race and controlled by artificial intelligence for the rest.The new DevBot will be used for the first two seasons, known as ‘Alpha’ and ‘Beta’.Roborace CEO and 2016/17 Formula E champion Lucas di Grassi explained that this is to make the driverless technology clearer to people watching.“We changed our mind,” di Grassi told Motorsport.com. “The initial idea was to do it with the Robocar.“The impression of a driver driving and then jumping out much better exemplifies the difference between human and autonomous driving.“Most importantly, I think motorsport has to have a human component. It’s always been about human and machine.”Di Grassi said “six or seven” new cars were being built, that the company is still developing the software to ensure they can race head-to-head and the final format is not set.After evaluating how the concept will work in its ‘Alpha’ and ‘Beta’ seasons, Roborace plans to switch to the Robocar for the category’s ‘full release’ in 2021, which will be considered its first proper season.The current Robocar, launched officially in early 2017, is completely autonomous and has a bold, unique design with no cockpit. However, this is likely to change because Roborace wants the final car to be able to be controlled by a driver.Di Grassi said the 2021 car would be “like the son of Roborace and DevBot together” with the latest available technology.He envisions the final product to have more than 1000kW (1341bhp) of power, four electric motors and the ability for each motor to control the power to each wheel.The ex-Formula 1 driver says two teams have already signed up for Roborace’s first season, and the calendar is due at the end of the year.Roborace will supply the hardware, coordinate the logistics of the series and maintain the cars centrally, with teams only responsible for designing software to keep costs down and ensure the category promotes specific tech development.This will enable Roborace to enter one car itself on an open platform that will allow university students or individuals to develop racing algorithms themselves, showcase their skills and be hired by the major manufacturers and companies Roborace is hoping to tempt with bespoke entries. See If Roborace DevBot Can Beat Drift Driver Around A Track Source: Electric Vehicle News Roborace’s ‘Season Alpha’ is due to launch in spring next year, supporting some Formula E events, and the series will use an evolution of the development car that can also be driven by a human.More Roborace Action First Season Of Roborace To Feature … Human Drivers 11 photos Watch Roborace Complete Autonomous Run At Goodwood Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 10, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Top 10 Reasons To Do Everything You Can To Buy A Tesla

first_imgYet another Tesla Model 3 owner that’s beyond enamored with his purchase.Yes, there are a grand slew of Tesla haters and short sellers that will continue to push their narrative and try to convince us and others that the Model 3 is a crappy car. Sure, it’s wrought with a plethora of early issues and it just plain sucks for sure. C’mon, Tesla builds this GD POS in a tent, so it must be a lemon, right? Um … no, not at all. Yes, some early copies may have been a wee bit sketchy (as is true of nearly every first-year model), but now, everything points to this being a first-rate automobile in every sense of the definition.Additional Tesla Model 3 Reviews: As the truth continues to come out, we’re of the opinion that you should really buy a Model 3 if you can find a way to afford it. And, we’re far from alone on that opinion. Yes, Tesla vehicles are not cheap. Most people couldn’t afford one if they tried (myself included). But, if there’s any way you can make it work, push forth. As far as we’re concerned, you won’t be disappointed, and this recent review supports that opinion.Check out the video above and then let us know your thoughts in the comment section below.Video Description via model3man on YouTube:Top 10 Reasons to Buy a Tesla Model 3This video has been a long time in the making! The more I use my Model 3, the clearer my understanding has become of what makes Tesla cars so great! Unfortunately, aside from my top 10, there were two additional reasons I just could NOT leave out. So, actually, it’s my top ten – PLUS 2 bonus reasons Folks, this list IS of course subjective. It’s MY take on why buying a Model 3 is almost a no-brainer. If you have additional reasons for loving your Model 3, please throw them into the comments section below. I did kind of wonder what @elonmusk would choose as HIS 10 top reasons – and perhaps we’ll never know that – but each person will have their own special likes and dislikes. This video is all about MY LIKES.Yes – it is 30 minutes in length – but it could have been an hour. Or two! I cut it down as much as I could, but it is REALLY easy viewing, so stay with it and you’ll consider it time well spent! Check Out This Brand-New In-Depth Tesla Model 3 Review Here’s Perhaps The World’s Most Comprehensive Tesla Model 3 Review Tesla Model 3 Review: After 6 Months And 10,000 Miles: Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 9, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

How Tesla is taking over neighborhoods with solar energy

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Tesla has been betting on word of mouth to promote most of its products and solar has been no exception since it has acquired SolarCityHere’s how Tesla has been taking over neighborhoods with solar energy thanks to the help satisfied customers. more…The post How Tesla is taking over neighborhoods with solar energy appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Open Card Surgery How To Hack A Tesla Model 3 Key Card

first_imgZack Nelson searches for a better form factor for the Model 3’s RFID chip.There are currently several ways to enter your Tesla Model 3. The most common way is via Bluetooth on your smartphone. But Tesla provides two backup methods. Every Model 3 comes with a credit card sized key card. A more traditional key fob is also available as an optional purchase.More About Tesla Key Fobs And Cards Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 23, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Well, three means of entry just isn’t enough for YouTube creator Zack Nelson. He is the host of the DIY channel Jerry Rig Everything. So it is in his nature to fiddle with technology to fit his personal taste. So why is he slaughtering these poor Model 3 key cards?Personally, I think the shape of this key card is quite obnoxious. (…) I vote we hack into the card, see how it works, and try to physically modify it into something else.Zack begins his work by cutting along the edge, exposing the copper wiring of the RFID card’s antenna. Unfortunately he destroys the first card in this process.The real experiment begins on the second card as he dips it into a jar of acetone. The chemical eats away at materials like plastic and rubber without causing harm to the chip and wiring hidden within. This allows him to safely remove the tiny RFID chip and wiring without damaging either.He then tests the bare antenna with the Model 3 in different shapes in preparation of a new design. So far he has not decided on a final form factor. Should he make a bracelet? A ring? Perhaps a necklace?Be sure to check out the full video above and let us know what you would find most convenient in the comments below!Video Description By JerryRigEverything On YouTubeIts time to see how the Tesla Model 3 Key card works. Lets physically hack it open and see what components are inside.Huge thanks to Ben Sullins for letting me sacrifice his Tesla key.What should I make with the dismantled key? Tesla Model 3 Uses Key Card Instead Of Key Fob? Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 Key Fob Review: Should You Pony Up $150? Find Out What’s Inside A Tesla Key Fob Herelast_img read more

Road Test 2019 Ford Mustang EcoBoost Convertible Premium

first_imgSource: Electric, Hybrid, Clean Diesel & High-MPG Vehicles A Modern Retro-Styled Pony carDoes every Mustang have to be a 460+ horsepower, fire-breathing monster to have any fun? Spend some time in the 2019 Ford Mustang EcoBoost, and the answer becomes quite apparent—the hp is not needed.A classic–updatedThe 2019 Mustang comes in three versions: GT, Bullitt and EcoBoost. Clean Fleet Report spent a fun-filled week in the Mustang EcoBoost Convertible Premium, coming to the realization that our recent time in the GT may have been exhilarating, but not at all indicative of what owning a version of the base model Mustang is all about.Healthy Power and PerformanceThe rear-wheel drive Mustang EcoBoost comes with a turbocharged 2.3-liter I4, producing a very usable 310 horsepower (hp) and 350 pounds-feet of torque. The engine is smooth, predictable and responsive as you go through the gears on the six-speed manual transmission. Ford has positioned the leather-trimmed shifter perfectly for angle and grip size, for slow or hard shifting. The clutch, with a good feel and smooth engagement, produced shifts with enough heft that reminds you this is a 3,676-pound Pony Car. In different iterations the 2019 Mustang is a true track star, and is now used in NASCAR.Right position, short throwsThe six-speed manual transmission allows the Mustang EcoBoost to be driven in a civil manner, including the option of leaving it in second gear to get around town. However, when it was go-time, the turbocharged 2.3-liter I4 came to life and was ready-and-able to spin the rear tires. The exhaust note was not nearly as throaty as on the GT with the 460-hp V8, but did have a satisfying grumble that increased when ramping-up to full throttle. Zero-to-60 mph times were right around 5.1 seconds. The acceleration is linear with no turbo lag. Pushback in the seat comes at 3,000 rpm and stays consistent and stout through the 6,500-rpm red line.The EPA has rated the EcoBoost at 20 city/28 highway/23 combined. In 410 miles driving around Southern California we averaged 24 mpg, so right about as estimated. However, in a 100-mile run with the cruise control set at 65 mph, we averaged 34 mpg, exceeding the EPA figure. This fuel economy is encouraging, but it will take a wide-open road to equal it. The real world of driving fun, or getting hung-up in stop-and-go traffic, will use more fuel.The fuel economy numbers reported by Clean Fleet Report are non-scientific. They represent the reviewer’s driving experience, but should be similar to most drivers living in our reviewer’s cities. If you live in cold weather, high in the mountains, spend time in the city or stuck in rush hour traffic, your numbers may differ.Top Down FunTop down, but no penaltyClean Fleet Report took delivery of a 2019 Ford Mustang EcoBoost convertible in December 2018. If not in Southern California, this may be an iffy time of year to put the top down, but heck, never tell someone from California they can’t do something. As it turns out, we had six beautiful days and one with rain. For a drought-stressed state, there are no complaints. The power top on the Mustang is operated by turning three latches and the pushing of a button. Up and down was a matter of a few silent seconds. When down, the cabin is largely protected from wind, especially with the windows up. With the top up, noise is well damped-down as the top is lined and insulated.Once out on the road, the 2019 Ford Mustang EcoBoost has an easy learning curve. The electric power steering delivered good road feel, aided by Pirelli P Zero 255/40R summer tires on optional 19-inch aluminum wheels. The grip was excellent, thanks in a big part to the independent rear suspension, only under the hardest of cornering did the rear end have to catch-up with the front. This became predictable as the optional MagneRide damping system kept the rear tires planted.Interior SimplicityThe look may be retro, but everything’s state-of-the-artThe 2019 Ford Mustang interior has a comfy and retro feel to it. Gauges are large and easy to read, with black backgrounds with white letters. All controls, including the large dual zone climate control wheels, are within easy reach of the driver. Clean Fleet Report’s Mustang came with the Performance trim level that included leather-trimmed, black leather power seats with accent stitching on the seats, console and heated steering wheel. The materials were designed to be exposed to the elements, so they may not appear to be as upscale as found on other cars. The front seats were comfortable, while the rear is best for those of a smaller stature. Folding the split rear seat gives the Mustang the most versatility for stowing luggage and bags for long road trips.The nine-speaker infotainment system includes navigation and SiriusXM/FM/CD/HDAM with MP3 playback capability. USB ports with iPod connectivity, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, music streaming via Bluetooth and hands-free phone capability complete the system. All this is viewed through a 12-inch, high-resolution LCD touch-screen. The SYNC Connect 4G LTE Wi-Fi supports up to 20 devices.The Classic Mustang LookA long hood with a short trunk lid sums-up the classic Pony Car design. Made famous in the 1960s by the Mustang, Chevrolet Camaro and Dodge Challenger (and others), the look on all three continues to this day. The 2019 Mustang has its own personality.The originalMost Mustangs will be sold as a coupe which has the distinctive fastback design and is done in a modern retro-style, harkening back to the 1965 Mustang. From the LED head and fog lights to the sequential turn-signal taillights, the 2019 Mustang is a good-looking car. To be a bit unique, our test Mustang came in green, but not just any green—Need For Green!Convenience and SafetyThe 2019 Ford Mustang has available features of cruise control, a power tilt and telescoping steering column, rear vision camera, power and heated exterior mirrors, power windows with one-touch up and down, keyless start and entry, passive entry system and a theft deterrent system. Safety features include frontal and side impact airbags, tire pressure monitor and a reverse sensing system.Pricing and WarrantiesClean Fleet Report’s 2019 Ford Mustang EcoBoost Convertible Premium had a base price of $36,360. With the 201A Package and other optional equipment, the MSRP came to $44,120. All prices exclude the $995 destination and delivery charge.The best use of the back seatThe 2019 Ford Mustang EcoBoost comes with these warranties:Bumper-to-Bumper         Three years/36,000 milesPowertrain                         Five years/60,000 milesRoadside Assistance        Five years/60,000 milesCorrosion (perforation)  Five years/Unlimited milesObservations: 2019 Ford Mustang EcoBoost Convertible PremiumWhat a fun car with affordable performance and attractive styling! The performance was more than adequate for a sporty drive, whether on mountain curves or cruising leisurely your favorite highway or back road. Where I live in Southern California, the Mustang convertible is a very frequent sight on Pacific Coast Highway or in the desert, where going topless is as de rigueur as anything else considered cool in the Golden State.The blend of old and new is a winnerWhen visiting your Ford dealer, tell the rep you want to drive the EcoBoost and the GT coupe and convertible. This way you will know which of the iconic Mustangs could be right for you.Whatever you end up buying, enjoy your new car. Happy Driving!Make sure to opt-in to the Clean Fleet Report newsletter (top right of page) to be notified of all new stories and vehicle reviews.Photos: Lex Adams [See image gallery at www.cleanfleetreport.com] Related Stories you Might Enjoy—Coupes de graceEvent: 2018 Ford Mustang GT Flash DriveNews: Ford May Resurrect Mach 1 Nameplate for EVRoad Test: 2019 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray CoupeRoad Test: 2019 Hyundai Veloster Turbo R-SpecRoad Test: 2018 Lexus LC 500hRoad Test: 2018 Audi A5 CoupeRoad Test: 2018 Toyota 86 GTRoad Test: 2017 Hyundai Veloster TurboRoad Test: 2015 Dodge Challenger SXTDisclosure:Clean Fleet Report is loaned free test vehicles from automakers to evaluate, typically for a week at a time. Our road tests are based on this one-week drive of a new vehicle. Because of this we don’t address issues such as long-term reliability or total cost of ownership. In addition, we are often invited to manufacturer events highlighting new vehicles or technology. As part of these events we may be offered free transportation, lodging or meals. We do our best to present our unvarnished evaluations of vehicles and news irrespective of these inducements.Our focus is on vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in their class, which leads us to emphasize electric cars, plug-in hybrids, hybrids and diesels. We also feature those efficient gas-powered vehicles that are among the top mpg vehicles in their class. In addition, we aim to offer reviews and news on advanced technology and the alternative fuel vehicle market. We welcome any feedback from vehicle owners and are dedicated to providing a forum for alternative viewpoints. Please let us know your views at publisher@cleanfleetreport.com.last_img read more

Tesla Model 3 driver again dies in crash with trailer Autopilot not

first_imgEarlier today, a Tesla Model 3 owner died in a tragic accident with a semi truck. The Model 3 went under the truck’s trailer resulting “in the roof being sheared off as it passed underneath,” which is known as a “side underride” accident.The circumstances are extremely similar to the famous 2016 fatal Autopilot crash. The accident is still under investigation and Autopilot hasn’t been ruled out. more…The post Tesla Model 3 driver again dies in crash with trailer, Autopilot not yet ruled out appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img read more

Tesla releases new Autopilot safety report more crashes but still fewer than

first_imgTesla has released its new Autopilot safety report for the first quarter of 2019. It’s the automaker’s third report since launching this new initiative in response to what the company saw as unfair coverage of accidents involving its vehicles by the media.The new report shows more crashes when using Autopilot, but the data shows that you are still less likely to have an accident on Autopilot than when it is not engaged. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xVp0Cr2Pg4gThe post Tesla releases new Autopilot safety report: more crashes but still fewer than when humans drive appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img read more

Locke Lord Latham VE and TK Advise in Enterprises 2 Billion Eagle

first_img Password Remember me Enterprise Products Partners announced that it has agreed to purchase Eagle Ford Shale company EFS Midstream from affiliates of Pioneer Natural Resources and Reliance Industries for $2.15 billion . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.center_img Lost your password? Usernamelast_img

Sweden Implanting Chips in Your Right Hand to Eliminate Cash

first_imgThere have been many people who fear the forecasts of the Bible’s Revelations and the sign of the Beast that no one will be able to buy or sell without receiving “a mark on their right hand or on their foreheads, and that no one may buy or sell except one who has the mark or the name of the beast, or the number of his name” (Revelation 13:16-17). Now you would think that someone would be concerned about mimicking that forecast. That does not seem to stop the trend to implant chips in your right hand which is your debt/credit card on a chip about the size of a grain of rice. All you do is wave your hand and you just paid for everything.Of course, there is a slight problem. The powers that be know who your are, where you are, and you have surrendered all privacy. Perhaps there is no stopping this trend. The governments are in such desperate need of taxation and Quantitative Easing has failed because they argue people withdrew their case from the banks. They have ended bailouts in Europe and the future head of the European Central Bank, Christine Lagarde, is a champion of eliminating money and believes that each country should create their own cryptocurrency and all freedom will come to an end.This very idea of implanting chips into your hand and eliminating all physical money is a dream come true. I believe it will become one proposal on the table in 2021-2022. Our computer which show major confrontations arising into 2032 which will also involve religion, certainly seems plausible after 4,000 people have accepted chips in Sweden who think this is cool. Categories: The Hunt for Taxes « Income or Privilege Tax?last_img read more

Rethinking Aging

first_imgby, Dan LevittTweetShare39ShareEmail39 SharesAs an undergraduate student, I was inspired to become a gerontologist after learning about the 1976 research study in which psychologists Ellen Langer and Judith Rodin investigated the effects of choice and enhanced personal responsibility for the aged, which resulted in a groundbreaking study on the impact of loneliness on seniors. They selected two floors of a nursing home. One group was told the staff was there to help them. Despite the care, 71 percent got worse in co-morbidity quality indicators in only three weeks. On the other floor, where seniors were encouraged to make decisions for themselves, 93 percent of the residents improved their quality of life. They were more active and happier. They were more mentally alert and more engaged in activities.Today the aged care industry is changing dramatically around the globe – and a shift towards personal responsibility and societal interaction is at the forefront of this revolution.Nursing homes are being replaced with centres of living, designed as small households where perhaps a dozen people live together. They share meals around a large dining room table, with an open kitchen and access to food 24/7. The seniors choose what they want to do and when they want to do it. The small homes have no characteristic features of a traditional nursing home. There is no central nursing station and no long corridors or bright fluorescent lights. Residents are not rushed to make it to a meal on time. Such revolutionary models are disrupting the aged-care sector and, in some markets, traditional old-age institutions are reinventing themselves as small homes or closing down.We are also seeing homes for the aged being built in the midst of residential neighbourhoods, creating a community hub not just for seniors but also for middle-aged adults, young adults and children. These vibrant town centres are complete with community amenities such as libraries, pools, restaurants, child care, schools, and senior wellness centres.In a Netherland’s university, it was found that student dormitories were full, but a nearby home for the aged had vacant suites. Students were invited to move in with the seniors, and soon became actively engaged in the new multigenerational community. This movement has morphed across Europe, where families live nearby, becoming volunteers supporting seniors while their kids adopt a senior as a grandparent.The more famous dementia village, a short-train ride from Amsterdam, turned the nursing home upside down with its small-house concept of six people living in a household with walkable access to a complete village within a secured perimeter. The most innovative aspect of this community is the general store where seniors, accompanied by a caregiver, shop each day for the household groceries and supplies. These seniors, most of whom have advanced dementia, are experiencing industry leading aged care a generation ahead of its time.In Tokyo Japan, 10 centenarians with dementia live together in a group home where their daily choices include meals, walking exercises, and meaningful activities. Seniors are retrained so they longer use incontinence pads, saving money while improving dignity, self-esteem and quality of life. Physiotherapists mobilize seniors out of their wheelchairs to walk with mobility aides.The Village Movement is an offshoot of the sharing economy. Hundreds of online virtual villages are popping up all over the United States with more on the drawing boards. These villages are low-cost ways to age in place and can delay going to assisted-living facilities. The core of these villages is referrals to household repair services, yardwork, picking up prescriptions or taking members shopping, to the doctor or even personal trainers.Another innovative living option is senior cohousing, which is also focused on aging well in community. Residents design and manage senior cohousing themselves relying on mutual support and a resident caregiver they hire as needed. Communities are designed for physical accessibility as well as financial, environmental, and social sustainability.We have come a long way from how our grandparents were housed and treated. With the research and understanding now emerging, seniors housing is becoming more welcoming and healthy for future generations.Related PostsLargest For-Profit Nursing Homes Deliver ‘Significantly’ Worse Care, Report FindsA first-of-its-kind study finds that the nation’s largest for-profit nursing home chains deliver significantly lower quality of care than non-profit and government-owned nursing homes due primarily to reduced staffing. The analysis by the University of California San Francisco comes as no surprise to culture change advocates and organizations working to…We Need Better Ways to Train and Support Family CaregiversLast week, I wrote about an important new survey of family caregivers that shows nearly half are performing work that is often done by nurses, such as managing medications, caring for wounds, and operating medical equipment. The report, by AARP and United Hospital Fund, sheds important light on the often unrecognized role…Village Movement Seeks to Cultivate DiversityAround the country, the nonprofit Village model of neighbors helping neighbors has taken off. At last count, 205 Villages were open, with another 150 in development, in 46 states, all aimed at helping older adults remain in their own homes. But Villages often do not reflect the racial, ethnic, and…TweetShare39ShareEmail39 SharesTags: cohousing culture change senior center senior living Village to Villagelast_img read more

Scientists take a deep dive into differences between Zika and dengue virus

first_imgJul 6 2018New Study Examines Cellular, Molecular Differences Between Dengue, ZikaMore than two years after reports of skyrocketing Zika rates surfaced worldwide, questions still loom about this complicated virus.Florida State University researchers are one step closer to finding answers.In an article published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports, Professor of Biological Science Hengli Tang and his postdoctoral researcher Jianshe Lang take a deep dive into the differences between Zika and the Dengue virus.On the surface, these viruses are very similar -; they are both delivered by mosquito and their genetic material is organized similarly. Yet, Zika is much more effective at penetrating the body’s natural barriers against infections and leaves behind a trail of devastating effects on infected fetuses.”We were really looking at one specific aspect,” Tang said. “Does Zika virus get to more sites because of the ability to disseminate through the body better than Dengue?”Tang and Lang found Zika has a unique ability to ferry the virus throughout the body when most viruses would be stopped.It all has to do with a type of immune cell called a macrophage.These warriors of the immune system basically engulf any type of foreign substance -; cellular debris, cancer cells, microbes -; that don’t make the proper proteins consistent with healthy body cells. Macrophages typically float throughout the bloodstream and when a virus invades, they flock to the site of the disease to fight it.That’s what happens when Dengue enters the body. It’s not, however, what happens when Zika enters the body, researchers found.Related StoriesVirus killing protein could be the real antiviral hero finds studySchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchComplement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchResearchers grew macrophages from stem cells in Tang’s lab. They then exposed these cells to either the Zika virus or the Dengue virus. The macrophages were then subjected to a test that measured the mobility of the infected cells.In the Dengue experiment, the macrophages were essentially immobilized as they stayed in one spot to fight the infection. The ones infected with Zika virus, however, maintained their ability to migrate on glass slides.That could be why the Zika virus is so effective, Tang said. In a mammal, the Zika-laden macrophages would have continued to float through the bloodstream.”They’re hitching a ride on macrophages to other parts of the body,” Tang said.Furthermore, Tang said, it appears that the Zika virus is actively suppressing the macrophage’s ability to carry out its typical duties in fighting disease.”Now the question is, with the increased ability to spread throughout the body, does Zika virus also use these infected macrophages to cross the placenta barrier, the blood-brain barrier and the testicular barrier?” Tang said. “If you understand how they cross these barriers, then you can develop more effective countermeasures to protect people.”Though Zika was discovered in 1947, little was known about how the virus worked when reports surfaced of a surge in cases worldwide in late 2015. Researchers and medical professionals rushed to learn as much as they could about the virus, but many questions remain as to how the virus actually functions. Tang and his colleagues at Johns Hopkins University were the first group of researchers to officially link Zika to microcephaly, a brain abnormality that occurs in developing fetuses. Source:https://news.fsu.edu/news/science-technology/2018/07/05/fsu-research-zika-suppresses-virus-fighting-cells/last_img read more

Painkiller prescriptions after wisdom tooth removal could set teens on path to

first_imgAug 9 2018Getting wisdom teeth removed may be a rite of passage for many teens and young adults, but the opioid painkiller prescriptions that many of them receive could set them on a path to long-term opioid use, a new study finds.Young people ages 13 to 30 who filled an opioid prescription immediately before or after they had their wisdom teeth out were nearly 2.7 times as likely as their peers to still be filling opioid prescriptions weeks or months later, according to new research from a University of Michigan team.Those in their late teens and twenties had the highest odds of persistent opioid use, compared with those of middle school and high school age, the researchers report in a research letter in the new issue of JAMA. Led by Calista Harbaugh, M.D., a U-M research fellow and surgical resident, the researchers used insurance data to focus on young people who were ‘opioid naïve’ — who hadn’t had an opioid prescription in the six months before their wisdom teeth came out, and who didn’t have any other procedures requiring anesthesia in the following year.”Wisdom tooth extraction is performed 3.5 million times a year in the United States, and many dentists routinely prescribe opioids in case patients need it for post-procedure pain,” says Harbaugh, a National Clinician Scholar at the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. “Until now, we haven’t had data on the long-term risks of opioid use after wisdom tooth extraction. We now see that a sizable number go on to fill opioid prescriptions long after we would expect they would need for recovery, and the main predictor of persistent use is whether or not they fill that initial prescription.”Other factors also predicted risk of long-term opioid use. Teens and young adults who had a history of mental health issues such as depression and anxiety, or chronic pain conditions, were more likely than others to go on to persistent use after filling their initial wisdom tooth-related prescription.More about the study In all, 1.3 percent of 56,686 wisdom tooth patients who filled their opioid prescription between 2009 and 2015 went on to persistent opioid use, defined as two or more prescriptions filled in the next year written by any provider for any reason. That’s compared with 0.5 percent of the 14,256 wisdom tooth patients who didn’t fill a prescription.Though those numbers may seem small, the high number of wisdom teeth procedures every year mean a large number of young people are at risk, notes Harbaugh, a research fellow with the Michigan Opioid Prescribing and Engagement Network, or Michigan OPEN.The team used data from employer-based insurance plans, available through the Truven MarketScan database purchased for researchers’ use by IHPI. Chad Brummett, M.D., co-director of Michigan OPEN, is senior author of the new research, and the team includes U-M School of Dentistry professor Romesh Nalliah, D.D.S., MHCM.Related StoriesBrush your teeth and use floss to slow down Alzheimer’sOpioids are major cause of pregnancy-related deaths in UtahUS dentists write more opioid prescriptions than England dentistsThe data show opioid prescriptions filled, but not actual use of opioid pills by patients. Leftover opioids pose a risk of their own, because they can be misused by the individual who received the prescription, or by a member of their household or a visitor. The researchers also couldn’t tell the reason for the later opioid prescription fills by those who went on to persistent use.The authors suggest that dentists and oral surgeons should consider prescribing non-opioid painkillers before opioids to their wisdom tooth patients. If pain is acute, they should prescribe less than the seven-day opioid supply recently recommended by the American Dental Association for any acute dental pain.”There are no prescribing recommendations specifically for wisdom tooth extraction,” says Harbaugh. “With evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories may be just as, if not more, effective, a seven-day opioid recommendation may still be too much.”Brummett adds, “These are some of the first data to the show long-term ill effects of routine opioid prescribing after tooth extractions. When taken together with the previous studies showing that opioids are not helpful in these cases, dentists and oral surgeons should stop routinely prescribing opioids for wisdom tooth extractions and likely other common dental procedures.”Nalliah, the dentist on the research team, agrees. “I believe that opioid prescribing for dental procedures can be cut to a fraction of what it is today,” he says. “Through wisdom tooth extraction, the dental profession has an enormous opportunity to fight the opioid crisis by preventing early introduction of opioids to America’s young people. We hope that our study will make my fellow dentists think twice about removing wisdom teeth, and to more strongly consider non-opioid solutions.”Importance for patients and parentsGetting a prescription for an opioid painkiller around the time of a wisdom tooth procedure comes with many decision points, Harbaugh says.”Patients must decide whether to fill the prescription and take the medication, and where to store and dispose of the unused pills. All of these decision points need to be discussed with patients,” she says. “Patients should talk to their dentists about how to control pain without opioids first. If needed, opioids should only be used for breakthrough pain, as backup if the pain’s not controlled with other medications.”The Michigan-OPEN team is currently studying the wisdom tooth extraction population further, by speaking with patients and parents about their experience and how many opioid pills they actually took. This will allow them to create evidence-based prescribing guidelines just like the ones they’ve developed for other operations. Source:http://ihpi.umich.edu/news/unwise-opioids-wisdom-teeth-study-shows-link-long-term-use-teens-young-adultslast_img read more

Top stories Rosettas comet results a new drug that stops cancer spreading

first_img Email Eight genes that make us brainiacsWhen it comes to certain parts of your brain, bigger is definitely better. Now, scientists have pinpointed eight genetic variations that help determine the size of key brain regions that influence everything from memory to motor control.By 98 to 1, U.S. Senate passes amendment saying climate change is real, not a hoax Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) This week, the U.S. Senate voted overwhelmingly—98 to 1—to approve an amendment affirming that climate change is real and “not a hoax.” But they still can’t agree on whether humans are causing it: Although two other measures declaring that humans contribute to climate change got a majority of votes, they fell short of the 60 votes needed to be adopted by the Senate.Nanoparticle drug stops cancer’s spread in miceWhen a person dies from cancer, the culprit usually isn’t the original tumor—it’s metastasis, the spread of cancer cells throughout the body. Now, researchers have managed to package a drug in nanoparticles so that it can target these cancer cells without interfering with normal cells—and report that they’ve stopped cancer cells from spreading in mice.Ten new Rosetta images that reveal comet 67P in all its gloryThis week, Science published the first scientific results from Rosetta at comet 67P, including discoveries from Rosetta’s main science camera, OSIRIS. Images like these reveal 67P to be a far more diverse place than anyone expected.Physicists read scrolls scorched by ancient volcanoIn 79 C.E., Mount Vesuvius erupted, destroying the city of Pompeii—and a nearby library filled with scrolls. Archaeologists have been trying to unroll these scorched scrolls since the 1750s, but the risk of damage was just too high. Now, physicists have figured out how to read them using high-powered x-rays.Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists moves Doomsday Clock 2 minutes closer to midnightThe board that runs the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has decided to move the minute hand on its symbolic Doomsday Clock 2 minutes closer to disaster. The clock now shows 3 minutes before midnight because the “probability of global catastrophe is very high” as a result of continuing climate change and efforts to modernize nuclear weapons stockpiles.last_img read more

European Union rejects plea to end animal research

first_imgSeveral scientists and research organizations praised the decision to stick with the existing E.U. legislation on the protection of research animals, saying it is drafted to help reduce, refine, and replace the use of animals in the lab. “Animal welfare in research settings has made such great strides that the arguments of antivivisection groups have become largely baseless,” said Jan Schnupp, professor of neuroscience at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, in a statement relayed by the Science Media Centre in London. “Hopefully we can start to put their propaganda behind us and celebrate and honor the high ethical standards and the enormous scientific achievements of the biomedical research community.”The commission said it will seek to speed up the development and uptake of alternative methods, and to better monitor compliance with the directive in member states. But animal welfare groups say that’s not enough. The Eurogroup for Animals in Brussels, for one, “is very disappointed that there is not even a minimal commitment to funding alternatives under programmes like [the E.U.’s research funding program] Horizon 2020 in the Commission’s Communication.” In particular, “more investment is needed in other areas [than toxicology], such as biomedical research,” which accounts for about two-thirds of animal tests in Europe, said the Eurogroup for Animals’ Director Reineke Hameleers in a statement yesterday.This is the third ECI submitted to the commission since this tool for direct democracy was introduced 3 years ago. (The second one also focused on scientific research: It sought to ban E.U. funding for research on embryonic stem cells.) All three initiatives have now been rejected, adding to the discontent of citizens’ groups that say that ECIs lack teeth and that their rules are impractical. The European Commission has rejected a plea to abolish animal research across the European Union, saying that doing so would harm biomedical research.On 3 March, a so-called European Citizens’ Initiative (ECI) signed by 1.17 million signatories formally urged the commission to scrap a 2010 directive regulating the use of animals in scientific research and to propose new rules phasing out animal research in favor of “more accurate, reliable, human-relevant methods.” In reaction, many science organizations and a group of Nobel laureates spoke out in defense of animal research.The commission had until yesterday to consider turning the ECI, called Stop Vivisection, into legislation. In its official response, the commission broadly sides with animal research advocates. As to the petition signers, “we agree with your goal, we share your belief that animal testing should be phased out,” budget commissioner Kristalina Georgieva said after a meeting of the College of Commissioners in Brussels yesterday. However, “it is premature at this stage to abruptly put a stop to animal testing because too many scientific advances are dependent on this form of testing,” Georgieva told reporters. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. 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Volcanoes sound like jet planes—and that could help calculate how hard they

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA—Researchers are always looking for better ways to predict volcanic hazards. Now, some scientists are turning to a seldom-studied phenomenon: eruption acoustics. It turns out that the noises made by volcanoes and humanmade rockets or jets have very similar sounds. Similar, because jets and eruptions work in much the same way: Material inside a chamber overpressurizes until it bursts through an opening—a nozzle in the case of rockets, or a volcanic vent. Because rockets are engineered so that fuel and air flow are precisely calculated, careful evaluation of eruption sounds should help determine the amount of material erupted, say researchers presenting at a poster session today at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union. Using infrasound microphones, the team has already confirmed that the sounds produced just outside a small vent at Aso volcano in Japan are analogous to those that boom through a rocket’s nozzle. Next up: Find a bigger eruption, and collect enough data to make models that could predict the consequences once a volcano has blown.last_img read more